Researchers Explore What Makes Clairaudient Spirit Mediums Different

Researchers led by Durham University, in collaboration with Northumbria University, recently set out to understand the differences between a group of clairaudient spirit mediums — people who claim to hear voices of the dead — and the general public.

Source: Researchers Explore What Makes Clairaudient Spirit Mediums Different

The Bizarre Tale of the Vanishing, Time-Traveling Train | Mysterious Universe

It seems that anything at all can go missing without a trace. I have written extensively on vanished people, vanished planes, even vanished nukes. The world seems to have a way of sometimes just swallowing people and things up. Yet among these many stories some stand out as particularly odd, pushing past the boundaries of mundane possible answers and lodging themselves firmly into the world of the weird. One such case must surely be one that has made the rounds talking about a whole train that not only disappeared without a trace, but also seemingly managed to go traveling around time and space….

Source: The Bizarre Tale of the Vanishing, Time-Traveling Train | Mysterious Universe

The Strange Tale of the Mysterious Lost Family of the Taiga | Mysterious Universe

There are few places on our planet as desolate and forbidding as the Siberian taiga. Here is a never-ending vast expanse of permanently frozen earth, icy bogs, frigid lakes and rivers, perilous mountains, and scattered dark forests prowled by bears and wolves. This is a land that has defied civilization and mankind since time unremembered,… Read more »

Source: The Strange Tale of the Mysterious Lost Family of the Taiga | Mysterious Universe

‘Miracle’ Blood of St. Januarius Fails to Liquefy — Is 2020 About to Get Even Worse? | Mysterious Universe

When looking for predictions on what to expect next year, some people turn to the writings of Nostradamus and Baba Vanga. Others turn to economists or Magic 8-Balls (same thing?). In Naples, Italy, many rely on St. Januarius – or more specifically, his dried blood. Every year on December 16th, a local Catholic leader removes a tiny vial purported to be the blood of this 3rd century martyr from its protective chamber in the Royal Chapel of the Naples Cathedral … and, with the anxious throngs assembled in the church and more watching online and on closed-circuit TV, waits. If the blood liquefies, all is good until the first Sunday of May (this ’miracle’ is said to happen three times annually – also in September). And if it doesn’t? Legend has it previous failures to liquefy preceded 22 epidemics, 11 revolutions, three droughts, 14 archbishops’ deaths (within a 30-day period), nine dead popes (within a few weeks), four wars, 19 earthquakes, and three religious persecutions. Oh, and it also failed to liquefy on December 16, 2019. Did anything bad happen shortly after that?

Source: ‘Miracle’ Blood of St. Januarius Fails to Liquefy — Is 2020 About to Get Even Worse? | Mysterious Universe

Mysterious People Who Appeared from Nowhere | Mysterious Universe

History is rife with strange tales of people who have mysteriously vanished from the face of the earth without a trace, but one area that seems to get decidedly less coverage is the various accounts of those who did just the opposite, appearing out of nowhere cloaked in mystery and emanating questions and puzzles around them that have never been satisfactorily answered. Here we have strangers who have stepped out of thin air from another place, perhaps even another time or plane of existence, and have gone on to leave impenetrable mysteries in their wake to this day. Stepping out of blue and into our imagination, these baffling appearances represent a phenomena every bit as perplexing as strange disappearances. Let us journey into the bizarre world of mysterious individuals who seemingly appeared from nowhere…

Source: Mysterious People Who Appeared from Nowhere | Mysterious Universe

Did Psychic Sylvia Browne Predict the Coronavirus Pandemic Back in 2008? | Coast to Coast AM

Amid the ceaseless news coverage of the worrisome coronavirus crisis, a surprising name has emerged from the past to capture the attention of people online: the late psychic Sylvia Browne, who is being credited by some for predicting the pandemic twelve years ago.

Source: Did Psychic Sylvia Browne Predict the Coronavirus Pandemic Back in 2008? | Coast to Coast AM

Resurrection time for mere mortals

Death and  life are intertwined. Like Lazarus, people have been documented to arise from being clinically dead. I am very interested to know…what have these people experienced on the other side? This an interesting story found at mysteriousuniverse.org.

 

In a Rare Case of the Lazarus Syndrome, a Woman is Declared Dead Twice

That biblical passage comes from the story of Lazarus, who was brought back to life after being declared dead and buried four days before. Lazarus thus lent his name to any circumstance involving a person being brought back to life after being declared dead by a doctor or another person who knows the signs of death. While it’s popular in movie plots and novels, the so-called Lazarus Syndrome is extremely rare – only 37 cases have been verified worldwide since 1982.

Make that 38.

The Raising of Lazarus

“The patient was certified dead at 10.30pm in GMSH.”

Dr. Dasari Harish, head of the forensic medicine department at the Government Medical College and Hospital (GMCH)-32, told the Times of India that the case was discussed at a recent conference. Doctors at the Government Multispecialty Hospital (GMSH)-16 in Chandigarh (a city and a union territory in northern India) declared a 45-year-old female patient dead due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – an inflammatory lung condition that obstructs breathing. Dr. Harish says the doctors followed proper protocols when determining the time of death at 10.30 pm and placed what they thought was a corpse in an ambulance three hours later to be transported to the home of her relatives for the funeral. However, “signs of vitality were noticed by the relatives while transporting her body,” said Harish.

Uh-oh.

“They immediately unpacked her and brought to our hospital at 5:58 am. We were not even informed that she had already been declared dead by the previous hospital. After resuscitation and treatment, she was declared dead at 7:30 am in GMCH.”

As Dr. Harish pointed out, the woman had been declared officially dead by other doctors following proper protocols. Yes, doctors have been known to close ranks when controversy occurs, but the Lazarus Syndrome muddies the saline solution here. According to a US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health report, the Lazarus syndrome or Lazarus heart or ‘autoresuscitation after failed cardiopulmonary resuscitation’, is the “the unassisted return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest.” There is some thought that the heart could be stopped by pressure built up during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the heart may start beating again after the pressure is relieved. According to the Emergency Medicine Journal, it may also occur due to high doses or adrenaline (epinephrine) or the recreational ingestion of high doses of heroin and ecstasy. It doesn’t appear that any of these were the case with the poor woman in India. So, what caused this 38th case of the Lazarus Syndrome?

“We found it evidently as the first case of Lazarus phenomena from India. There are no certain reasons, but it is believed that some lifesaving drugs giving for resuscitation have a prolonged effect and perhaps rarely some patients can again come back to life and die again within 2-3 hours.”

Needless to say, that ambulance will have plenty of lawyers chasing it from now on.

Human life, reality and the new people we meet in our journy

A person I met today, a very intelligent, aware and enlightened women had brought up a very good point as well as the subject for today (And if you’re reading this post….thank you for a very good conversation and the chance to exchange ideas and get to know an “old soul”!) A little brief history of today…the subject of the paranormal had been brought up, she expressed her intensities about it as did I. The subject of alien civilizations and humans was introduced. Food for thought…could our human existence have been a “seeding” project for a much more advanced, truly alien faction or civilization and we are now, as in a few hundred to a thousand people per decade, year, month etc., becoming aware of this thought and the questions and are now starting come to terms that there may very well be our creators, and not what traditional religion(s) teach us?

Please do read this article in its entirety. The link to the full article from Scientific American Blog can be found below after the posted article:

Advanced Extraterrestrials as an Approximation to God

Our first encounter with E.T. technology could be as baffling to us as a smartphone would have been to a Neandertal

Despite the impression one gets from textbooks, our current knowledge of the universe represents a small island in a vast ocean of ignorance. The scientific enterprise is all about expanding the landmass of this island. And it is fun to engage in the activity of gaining knowledge; knowing everything in advance would have been much more boring. Still, it would be shocking to learn all at once of the discoveries of an alien civilization that been doing scientific and technological exploration for billions of years, in contrast to our mere few centuries. The eminent science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke codified this idea in the third of his three laws : “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” Put another way, members of such a civilization would appear to us as a pretty good approximation to God.

Meeting a piece of advanced technological equipment developed by an extraterrestrial intelligence might resemble an imaginary encounter of ancient cave people with a modern cell phone. At first, they would interpret it as a shiny rock, not recognizing it as a communication device. The same thing might have happened in reaction to the first detection of an interstellar visitor to the solar system, ‘Oumuamua, which showed six peculiar properties but was nevertheless interpreted as a rock by mainstream astronomers.

Because it would likely be relatively small, most advanced equipment could only be recognized in the darkness of space when it comes close enough to our nearest lamppost, the sun. We can search for technological “keys” under this lamppost, but most of them will stay unnoticed if they pass far away. More fundamentally, one may wonder whether we are able to recognize technologies that were not already developed by us. After all, these technologies might feature subtle purposes—like the cell phone communication signals that a cave person would miss.

Is there something we might be missing already here and now? When looking around us, the most mysterious phenomenon we encounter routinely is the sophistication of complex life. Some scientists wondered whether life itself was seeded on Earth by an alien civilization in a process called “directed panspermia.” One can imagine a probe that brought the seeds of life in the form of microbes or instead a 3-D printer that produced these seeds out of the raw materials on Earth based on a prescribed blueprint. The universal left-handedness (chirality) of all life-forms on Earth without exception can be interpreted as stemming from a single panspermia event, be it natural (through a rock arriving from space) or artificial in origin . Even in this context, our imagination of what aliens might do will improve once we are able to produce synthetic life in the laboratory.

The number of targeted probes that are needed to seed life artificially in the habitable zone of a planetary systems is far smaller than the number of natural rocks that serve the same purpose on random trajectories. The advantage of 3-D printing of life from raw materials on a target planet is that natural DNA samples live a finite lifetime and may eventually disintegrate in a few million years, whereas artificial machinery can be constructed to last much longer…

Read the full article here

 

Our world is filled with questions. We sometimes do find the answers. We seek life answers, then are presented with more questions than answers to those life questions we ask.

Is our journey through this life a “training” exercise? Revelations (if we allow it to happen) that we have to accept that death is merely the next step into a much bigger, grander process of our being as individuals that during and even after, impart so very much on small and even larger levels that we sometimes fail to see our every interaction, literally, DOES have impacting effects on those around us!

Simple scenario: your kindness to a stranger to help them out in public say with helping them with a supporting word or even a simple “hello, how are you today”, sensing that that person is undergoing something stressing or traumatic (although you truly don’t know this individual)…all because your genuine nature came into play without the thought of “what can I get in return”. And of course, there are millions of other examples, this one being a simple way to illustrate a point.

What are your thoughts on this theory, idea or revelation of an age old need to know the answer to this type of question?

-MG

Admin

Weird Skeletons

In 2004, scientists were stunned by the discovery of skeletons of what are thought to be an ancient race of people that stood about 3½ feet tall – about the height of a modern three-year-old. Found on the remote island of Indonesia, these pygmies were named Homo floresiensis and nicknamed “hobbits” because of their small size (their heads were no bigger than a grapefruit). The scientists believe this diminutive race died out about 13,000 years ago, although modern natives reported knowledge of a tiny race of people currently or recently living in isolated areas of the jungle.

These are not the first or only strange skeletons unearthed around the world – including the U.S. Whether you believe humans are the descendents of Adam and Eve, the result of millions of years of evolution or the genetic creations of the Annunaki, there are many puzzling specimens of skeletons, skulls and other human (or human-like) remains that can truly make one wonder about mankind’s past.

Here’s a bare-bones look at some of the more intriguing cases:

Horny Devils
Within an ancient burial mound near the town of Sayre in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, skeletons measuring approximately 7 feet in length were discovered in the 1800s. But the most remarkable feature of these tall skeletons was not their height, but the strange horn-like protrusions above the brow region on their skulls. It was estimated that they were buried around 1200 AD. According to some sources, the skeletons were sent to the American Investigating Museum in Philadelphia, and vanished.

All the Better to Eat You With, My Dear
In 1888, seven skeletons, which had been placed in a sitting position, were uncovered from a burial mound near Clearwater, Minnesota. The highly unusual skulls of these beings had double rows of teeth in both the upper and lower jaws. It was also noted that the foreheads were low and sloping, compared to “normal” human skulls, and had distinctly prominent brows.

Copper Man
The December 17, 1891 issue of the respected journal Nature reported the discovery of a giant man buried 14 feet within the center of one of Ohio’s mysterious burial mounds. The enormous man’s arms, jaw, arms, chest and stomach were all clad in copper. Wooden antlers, also covered with copper, rested on either side of his head. His mouth was filled with large pearls, and a pearl-studded necklace of bear teeth hung around his neck. Who this man was, or to which race of people he belonged, is unknown.

The Mica Giant
In 1879, a burial mound in Brewersville, Indiana yielded another giant skeleton, according to the November, 1975 edition of The Indianapolis News. This one reached 9 feet 8 inches tall! It wore a necklace of mica stone, and a crude human effigy of clay was found standing at his feet. The giant skeleton was examined by scientists from Indiana and New York, and it remained in the possession of Mr. Robinson, who owned the land on which the mound stood. Unfortunately, the curious bones were washed away in a flood in 1937.

Coneheads
Researcher Robert Connolly photographed this strange elongated skull in 1995. It was found in South America and is estimated to be tens of thousands of years old. Apart from its obvious abnormalities, it also exhibits characteristics of both Neanderthal and human skulls – impossible in itself, according to anthropology texts, since Neanderthals did not exist in South America. Some believe that the unusual shape of the skulls might be the result of a primitive practice known as “skull binding” in which a person’s head is tightly bound with cloth or leather straps throughout his lifetime, causing the skull to grow in this dramatic way. The skull-binding theory is contested, however, for this and other cone-shaped skulls, and you can read about them in more detail at Anomalous Skulls.

Small Wonders
Near Coshocton, Ohio in 1837, several fully developed adult skeletons were found buried in tiny wooden coffins. Why tiny coffins? Because these adult skeletons were only 3 to 4½ feet tall. No artifacts were found with the remains that might give clues as to who these small people were, but there were so many of them that researchers believed they could have been the residents of a small city.

Pedro Mountain Mummy
“Pedro,” as he has been nicknamed, is one of the most famous enigmatic human remains ever found. He was discovered by gold prospectors in 1932 when they were dynamiting through the canyons of the Pedro Mountains, which rise about 60 miles southwest of Casper, Wyoming. There he was, sitting cross-legged on a ledge with his hands resting serenely in his lap. (See photo.) He was completely mummified. What’s astonishing, however, is that this middle-aged-looking man appeared to be only 14 inches tall! But it might not have been an adult at all. Although the mummy has been lost, X-rays survive and one modern analysis concluded that Pedro was actually an infant, or even a fetus, that might have been afflicted with the disease anencephaly.

Red Giants
In 1911, miners were digging out layers of guano from a cave located about 22 miles southwest of Lovelock, Nevada when they happened upon the mummified remains of an individual who must have stood 6½ feet tall when alive. A tall Native American, perhaps? Probably not, since the mummy was still crowned with “distinctly red” hair. Amazingly, the ancient legends of the local Paiute Indians described a race of red-haired giants – called Si-te-cahs – who were the enemies of many Indian tribes of the region.

The Starchild Skull
Lloyd Pye, author of Everything You Know Is Wrong, has taken it upon himself to discover the identity of an unusual skull he has dubbed “The Starchild Skull.” The skull, which was found in a mine shaft near Chihuahua, Mexico around 1930, is unusually wide at the back and exhibits larger than normal eye sockets. Although he says the origin of the skull is uncertain, Pye speculates on whether or not it could be of alien origin – or at least belonging to a human-alien hybrid. While some contend that the skull was merely that of a deformed human child, Pye wanted definitive proof and so, in late 1999, subjected the skull to DNA testing. The results of the test indicated that the skull was from a human being, but Pye points out that the lab could not extract sufficient strands of DNA to make a definitive conclusion, and therefore the question still remains open.

Fatheads
Robert Connolly has photographed a similar, more complete skulls. (See photos.) In most respects it appears to be that of a human, except that it has an extraordinarily large cranium and eye sockets. The eye sockets are about 15 percent larger than a modern human’s. The age and date of the skull are unknown. Similar skulls appear in photos by Karen Scheidt of remains found in a Mexican cave. Could they all be genetic mutations, some unknown species of creature or something not of this world?

Native American folklore & the little people

The Native peoples of North America told legends of a race of “little people” who lived in the woods near sandy hills and sometimes near rocks located along large bodies of water, such as the Great Lakes. Often described as “hairy-faced dwarfs” in stories, petroglyphs illustrations show them with horns on their head and traveling in a group of 5 to 7 per canoe.[1]
How Morning Star Lost her Fish – from Stories the Iroquois Tell Their Children by Mabel Powers 1917

Native legends often talk of the little people playing pranks on people such as singing and then hiding when an inquisitive person searches for the music. It is often said that the little people love children and would take them away from bad or abusive parents or if the child was without parents and left in the woods to fend for themselves.

Other legends say the little people if seen by an adult human would beg them not to say anything of their existence and would reward those who kept their word by helping them and their family out in times of need. From tribe to tribe there are variations of what the little people’s mannerisms were like, and whether they were good or evil may be different. Many of the elders still have a belief in these beings, but younger generations tend not to believe in these stories.

One of the common beliefs is that the little people create distractions to cause mischief. They were believed to be gods by some. One North American Native tribe believed that they lived in nearby caves.[citation needed] The caves were never entered for fear of disturbing the little people.

The physical remains of tiny people have been reported found in various locations in the western United States, particularly Montana and Wyoming. Typically these are described as being found in caves with various details such as descriptions that they were “perfectly formed”, dwarf-size, etc. Archeologist Lawrence L. Loendorf notes that “The burials, of course, are always sent to a local university or to the Smithsonian for analysis, only to have both the specimens and research results disappear.”[2] Loendorf also suggests that the discovery of two mummies of anencephalic infants in the first half of the twentieth century with deformities that caused some people to believe they were adults has “contributed to public belief in the existence of a group of tiny prehistoric people.[3]

A graveyard unearthed in the 1830s in Coshocton County, Ohio was believed to contain skeletons belonging to a pygmy race. In fact that the graves, only about three feet long, were “bone burials” containing disarticulated or bent bones packed together.[4]
Native American little people

Geow-lud-mo-sis-ing
Ircinraq – Yup’ik
Ishigaq – Inuit
Jogahoh – Iroquois[5]
Mannegishi – Cree
Memegwesi/Memegawensi/Memengweshii/Pa’iins – Anishinaabe[6]
Nimerigar – Shoshone
Nirumbee[7] or Awwakkulé[8] – Crow
Nunnupi – Comanche
Pukwudgie – Wampanoag
Yehasuri – Catawba
Yunwi Tsundi – Cherokee

The Native American little people were said to reside in the Pryor Mountains of Montana and Wyoming. The Pryors are famous for their “fairy rings” and strange happenings. Some members of the Crow tribe consider the little people to be sacred ancestors and require leaving an offering for them upon entry to the area.

What we thought was our actual history may not be true

AS SOPHISTICATED TECHNOLOGICALLY as we have become on this planet, we are still pretty much in the dark when it comes to matters of our own existence. Where do we come from? What is our purpose here? What happens after we die?

These are the age-old questions. Science attempts to answer the first question only and doesn’t yet know how to deal with the other two. Religion, in its many forms, provides as many “certain” answers to all three questions, but with little or no evidence. A multitude of other philosophies have their own ideas.

With all our investigation, pondering, faith and meditation, however, we are no closer to knowing. The more we dig for answers to these questions, it seems, the more questions are raised.

Many fascinating questions are raised with regard to “where do we come from?” in Brad Steiger’s book,Worlds Before Our Own. First published in 1978 and out of print for several years, the book has recently been reprinted by Anomalist Books (along with several other of Brad’s titles, including Strange Guests and Shadow World, all of which I can heartily recommend).

Obviously, I have always been fascinated by discoveries and human experiences that don’t fit into the standard templates of what conventional science and even religion would have us accept. Thus, my preoccupation with ghost phenomena, psychic experiences and sightings of Bigfoot, to specify a few. This fascination also includes archaeological discoveries that do not fit neatly into the timelines currently laid out in scientific texts. (See “The 10 Most Puzzling Ancient Artifacts”.) Yet these discoveries exist, annoying as they may be to the commonly accepted theories.

Brad shares my excitement and wonder about these anomalies, which is why I gleefully relish books like Worlds Before Our Own. These anomalous findings – and there are thousands of them – stand out as real evidence that there very well may have been civilizations (possibly advanced) that pre-date any we are aware of. They may stretch back hundreds of thousands or even millions of years further than conventional histories.

IMPOSSIBLY OLD HUMAN REMAINS AND TRACKS

  • In the 1880s, anthropologists found the remains of a modern-looking man, woman and two children in glacial strata that were dated at 10 million years old – far older than the currently accepted model, which says modern man (homo sapiens) has only been around for about 200,000 years.
  • In 1971, while exploring a mine, an amateur geologist and archaeologist found a human tooth embedded in strata that was dated as 100 million years old.
  • In 1932, an experienced trapper found human footprints imprinted in the gypsum rock at White Sands, New Mexico. More astonishing, the prints measured 22 inches long!

GIANTS

  • Two brothers digging into ancient Indian mounds in Minnesota unearthed the skeletons of men that would have stood over eight feet tall.
  • In 1930, the New York Times reported the discovery by a mining operation in Mexico of human remains “averaging eight feet in height.”

PREHISTORIC SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

  • In 1968, a Russian archaeologist found a large-scale metallurgical factory dating back to some unknown civilization 4,500 years ago, where they made vases, knives, bracelets and more of copper, gold, iron and bronze.
  • In Haifa, Israel in 1966, researchers found in a cave a piece of manufactured glass measuring 11 feet long, 7 feet wide and 1½ feet thick and aged at 1,400 years old. Such a feat of glass making was not matched until the creation of the mirrors for the Mount Palomar telescopes in the 20th century.
  • The ancient Peruvians may have invented ballooning. In 1690, a Portuguese Jesuit priest recorded that he had actually seen the Peruvians flying about in hot-air balloons.

Again, this is just a small sampling of the wealth of intriguing anomalies Brad Steiger has assembled in Worlds Before Our Own.

Of course, we call them “anomalies” only in relation to current scientific belief. More correctly, they should be regarded as concrete evidence that we know very little about the true history of humankind on Earth – a history that is almost certainly far richer and older than we have imagined. Who knows what other astonishing discoveries await us in the coming years.

On the Trail of the Werewolf

Some people have accused me of Misanthropy;
And yet I know no more than the mahogany
That forms this desk, of what they mean;-Lycanthropy
I comprehend, for without transformation
Men become wolves on any slight occasion.
– Lord Byron

How real are werewolves?

Werewolves. People who shapeshift into howling, bloodthirsty wolves by the light of the full moon. As Lord Byron noted, this affliction is also known as lycanthropy. It’s a superstition that dates back centuries and has been popularized by books of fiction and dozens of films. Virtually every culture on the planet has lore and traditions of were-creatures.

But is there any truth to the werewolf legend?

In medical terms, lycanthropy is applied to people who suffer from the delusion that they transform into wolves. And physically there is a genetic condition called hypertrichosis in which a person, male or female, is mostly or even entirely covered in thick dark hair. All 32 members of the Aceves family in Mexico have this rare condition, for example. Some of them have become skilled acrobats and travel with a circus. Fajardo Aceves Jesus Manuel even bills himself as “Wolfman.” The family is currently under study by The Center of Biomedical Research in Guadalajara, Mexico.

Undoubtedly, throughout the centuries people with this genetic disorder have inspired the werewolf legend. In times past, they would have been shunned by society, even cast out by their own families. We can imagine that they would have sought refuge in the forests, surviving as best they could, like primitives… or animals… perhaps even killing to stay alive.

These tragic circumstances are a far cry from the werewolf tradition, however, in which a human literally transforms into a wolf.

So again we ask, is there any truth to the werewolf legend? There have been reports.

The Ohio Man Dog

On August 27, 2005, a truck driver named Scott called into the Coast to Coast radio show and told host Ian Punnett of his strange sighting. While driving, his truck’s headlights illuminated a strange scene: some kind of beast was crouched on the side of the road eating a deer. He described it as looking like a cross between “an ape with a dog’s head” and the werewolf from the horror film Van Helsing.

The Beast of Wisconsin and Michigan

In her book The Beast of Bray Road, Tailing Wisconsin’s Werewolf, Linda Godfrey chronicles the many encounters with The Dog Man, a werewolf-like creature that has been seen in the backwoods of northern Michigan and Wisconsin at least since 1936.

  • In 1938, a man named Robert Fortney of Cadillac, Michigan encountered a werewolf-like creature near Paris in Mecosta County, according to an April 25, 1987 article in the Record-Eagle by reporter Sheila Wissner: “Fear gripped Robert Fortney as he shot and killed one of five dogs that lunged at him as he stood on the banks of the Muskegon River in 1938. But fear escalated to cold terror as the only dog that didn’t run off reared up on its hind legs and stared at Fortney with slanted, evil eyes and the hint of a grin.”
  • Another story comes second-hand from an old lumberman. Two of his friends had been fishing on Claybank Lake late one day. They spotted something swimming in the water, which they at first thought was a coon hound that one of them owned. As the creature neared, however, they saw that it had a dog’s head but the body of a man! According to the tale, the fishermen had to actually beat the creature away with their oars to prevent it from climbing into their boat.

The Beast of Gévaudan

A ferocious, man-killing animal terrorized south-central France in the mid-1760s. It was described as looking like a wolf, but of enormous proportions (the size of a donkey or cow), leading villagers to speculate that it was more than a mere wolf, rather a werewolf – a loup-garou. The huge creature was responsible for many gruesome deaths, children and adults alike. Those who fought it with guns and knives said it seemed impervious to weapons.

The beast’s attacks became so terrible and frequent that King Louis XV sent a troop of light cavalry to the area to slay it, but it always escaped, despite being wounded. A large reward was offered for the creature’s death, and finally in June 1767, a group of hunters set off after it. One of them, Jean Chastel, managed to shoot it directly in the heart… using silver bullets. The Beast of Gévaudan was dead. (Source: Unexplained! by Jerome Clark)

Hellhound or Werewolf

In August, 2003 I received this story from a reader:

“This really happened to my friend. She said that about four years ago her cat wanted to go out because her litter box was broken, so they took the cats out to use the ‘bathroom.’ Her yard is very long and at the end are woods, so she took her cat to the woods to use the bathroom, when she heard a growl. She looked up to see two red eyes staring at her in the woods, and her cat hissed and jumped out of her arms and ran into the woods. Then she heard it scream. When she heard that, she was frozen with fear and then the thing started to run after her. She forced herself to run, so she started to run with all her might. She looked back to see what it was. She explained that it had a hound’s face with a big body; its front legs were longer than the back ones, and it ran like a gorilla. She finally got to her porch and ran inside, then she slammed the door shut and looked out. It was gone. Some say it was a hellhound or a werewolf.”

Other miscellaneous facts:

  • England’s King John (reign, 1199-1216), a most unpopular monarch, was thought by the citizenry to be a werewolf. This was no doubt a demonization of a ruler they detested. Some time after his death, monks claimed to hear noises from his tomb, furthering the werewolf legend. They dug up his body and relocated it to unconsecrated ground.
  • According to a medieval cleric, you can become a werewolf by stripping naked under a full moon and rolling around in sand.
  • In 1682 in Fahrenholz, Germany, several people were accused of being able to transform themselves into wolves and were put on trial.
  • Some researchers contend that modern sightings of werewolves might actually be of another cryptozoological creature: Bigfoot.

Wagner the Wehr-Wolf

Do I have a werewolf ancestor? In 1846, a short book (of fiction, supposedly), known as a penny dreadful, entitled Wagner the Werewolf or Wagner the Were-Man was written by George W. Reynolds, a contemporary of Charles Dickens and William Makepeace Thackeray, and at the time more widely read that either of them. According to the “story,” Wagner was a German peasant who entered a pact with the devil, thereby gaining eternal life. The only catch was that he would become a werewolf every seven years. This also resulted in a series of supernatural adventures, with the beautiful murderess Nisida at his side. Ultimately, he gained salvation from some passing Rosicrucians.

Werewolves: A Field Guide to Shapeshifters, Lycanthropes, and Man-Beasts is a great book to find out much more about these legendary beasts of the night. With so many accounts through-out history of Werewolves, could there indeed be truth to these creatures?

Saint-Germain: The Immortal Count

Saint-Germain: The Immortal Count

He was an alchemist who, it is believed, discovered the secret of eternal life

   IS IT POSSIBLE that a man can achieve immortality – to live forever? That is the startling claim of a historical figure known as Count de Saint-Germain. Records date his birth to the late 1600s, although some believe that his longevity reaches back to the time of Christ. He has appeared many times throughout history – even as recently as the 1970s – always appearing to be about 45 years old. He was known by many of the most famous figures of European history, including Casanova, Madame de Pampadour, Voltaire, King Louis XV, Catherine the Great, Anton Mesmer and others.

Who was this mysterious man? Are the stories of his immortality mere legend and folklore? Or is it possible that he really did discover the secret of defeating death?

ORIGINS

When the man who first became known as Saint-Germain was born is unknown, although most accounts say he was born in the 1690s. A genealogy compiled by Annie Besant for her co-authored book, The Comte De St. Germain: The Secret of Kings, asserts that he was born the son of Francis Racoczi II, Prince of Transylvania in 1690. Other accounts, taken less seriously by most, say he was alive in the time of Jesus and attended the wedding at Cana, where the young Jesus turned water into wine. He was also said to be present at the council of Nicaea in 325 A.D.

What is almost unanimously agreed on, however, is that Saint-Germain became accomplished in the art of alchemy, the mystical “science” that strives to control the elements. The foremost goal of this practice was the creation of “projection powder” or the elusive “philosopher’s stone,” which, it was claimed, when added to the molten form of such base metals as lead could turn them into pure silver or gold. Furthermore, this magical power could be used in an elixir that would impart immortality on those who drank it. Count de Saint-Germain, it is believed, discovered this secret of alchemy.

COURTING EUROPEAN SOCIETY

Saint-Germain first came into prominence in the high society of Europe in 1742. He had just spent five years in the shah of Persia’s court where he had learned the jeweler’s craft. He beguiled the royals and the rich with his vast knowledge of science and history, his musical ability, his easy charm and quick wit. He spoke many languages fluently, including French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian and English, and was further familiar with Chinese, Latin, Arabic – even ancient Greek and Sanskrit.

It might have been his extraordinary learnedness that led acquaintances to see that he was a remarkable man, but an anecdote from 1760 most likely gave rise to the notion that Saint-Germain could be immortal. In Paris that year, Countess von Georgy heard that a Count de Saint-Germain had arrived for a soiree at the home of Madame de Pompadour, mistress of King Louis XV of France. The elderly countess was curious because she had known a Count de Saint-Germain while in Venice in 1710. Upon meeting the count again, she was astonished to see that he hadn’t appeared to age, and asked him if it was his father she knew in Venice.

“No, Madame,” he replied, “but I myself was living in Venice at the end of the last and the beginning of this century; I had the honor to pay you court then.”

“Forgive me, but that it impossible!” the perplexed countess said. “The Count de Saint-Germain I knew in those days was at least forty-five years old. And you, at the outside, are that age at present.”

“Madame, I am very old,” he said with a knowing smile.

“But then you must be nearly 100 years old,” said the astonished countess.

“That is not impossible,” the count told her matter-of-factly, then continued to convince the countess that he was indeed the same man she knew with the details of their previous meetings and of life in Venice 50 years earlier.

EVER PRESENT, NEVER AGING

Saint-Germain traveled extensively throughout Europe over the next 40 years – and in all that time never seemed to age. Those who met him were impressed by his many abilities and peculiarities:

  • He could play the violin like a virtuoso.
  • He was an accomplished painter.
  • Wherever he traveled, he set up an elaborate laboratory, presumably for his alchemy work.
  • He seemed to be a man of great wealth, but was not known to have any bank accounts. (If it was due to his ability to transmute base metals into gold, he never performed the feat for observers.)
  • He dined often with friends because he enjoyed their company, but was rarely seen to eat food in public. He subsisted, it was said, on a diet of oatmeal.
  • He prescribed recipes for the removal of facial wrinkles and for dyeing hair.
  • He loved jewels, and much of his clothing – including his shoes – were studded with them.
  • He had perfected a technique for painting jewels.
  • He claimed to be able to fuse several small diamonds into one large one. He also said he could make pearls grow to incredible sizes.
  • He has been linked to several secret societies, including the Rosicrucians, Freemasons, Society of Asiatic Brothers, the Knights of Light, the Illuminati and Order of the Templars.

The renowned 18th philosopher, Voltaire – himself a respected man of science and reason – said of Saint-Germain that he is “a man who never dies, and who knows everything.”

Throughout the 18th century, Count de Saint-Germain continued to use his seemingly endless knowledge of the world in the politics and social intrigues of the European elite:

  • The the 1740s he became a trusted diplomat in the court of King Louis XV of France, performing secret missions for him in England.
  • In 1760 he performed a similar function at the Hague, where he met the infamous lover, Giacomo Girolamo Casanova. Casanova later said of Saint-Germain, “This extraordinary man… would say in an easy, assured manner that he was 300 years old, that he knew the secret of the Universal Medicine, that he possessed a mastery over nature, that he could melt diamonds… all this, he said, was mere trifle to him.”
  • In 1762 he traveled to Russia where it is said he was complicit in a conspiracy that placed Catherine the Great on the throne. He later advised the commander of the imperial Russian armies in the war against Turkey (which they won).
  • In 1774 he returned to France when Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette occupied the throne. He allegedly warned them of the revolution that was to come 15 years in the future.

In 1779 he went to Hamburg, Germany, where he befriended Prince Charles of Hesse-Cassel. For the next five years, he lived as a guest in the prince’s castle at Eckernförde. And, according to local records, that is where Saint-Germain died on February 27, 1784.

BACK FROM THE DEAD

For any ordinary mortal, that would be the end of the story. But not for Count de Saint-Germain. He would continue to be seen throughout the 19th century and into the 20th century!

  • In 1785 he was seen in Germany with Anton Mesmer, the pioneer hypnotist. (Some claim that it was Saint-Germain who gave Mesmer the basic ideas for hypnotism and personal magnetism.)
  • Official records of Freemasonry show that they chose Saint-Germain as their representative for a convention in 1785.
  • After the taking of the Bastille in the French Revolution in 1789, the Comtesse d’Adhémar said she had a lengthy conversation with Count de Saint-Germain. He allegedly told her of France’s immediate future, as if he knew what was to come. In 1821, she wrote: “I have seen Saint-Germain again, each time to my amazement. I saw him when the queen [Antoinette] was murdered, on the 18th of Brumaire, on the day following the death of the Duke d’Enghien, in January, 1815, and on the eve of the murder of the Duke de Berry.” The last time she saw him was in 1820 – and each time he looked to be a man no older than his mid-40s.

After 1821, Saint-Germain may have taken on another identity. In his memoirs, Albert Vandam wrote of meeting a man who bore a striking resemblance to Count de Saint-Germain, but who went by the name of Major Fraser. Vandam wrote:

“He called himself Major Fraser, lived alone and never alluded to his family. Moreover he was lavish with money, though the source of his fortune remained a mystery to everyone. He possessed a marvelous knowledge of all the countries in Europe at all periods. His memory was absolutely incredible and, curiously enough, he often gave his hearers to understand that he had acquired his learning elsewhere than from books. Many is the time he has told me, with a strange smile, that he was certain he had known Nero, had spoken with Dante, and so on.”

Major Fraser disappeared without a trace.

Between 1880 and 1900, Saint-Germain’s name once again became prominent when members of the Theosophical Society, including famed mystic Helena Blavatsky, claimed that he was still alive and working toward the “spiritual development of the West.” There is even an allegedly genuine photo taken of Blavatsky and Saint-Germain together. And in 1897, the famous French singer Emma Calve dedicated an autographed portrait of herself to Saint-Germain.

The most recent appearance of a man claiming to be Saint-Germain was in 1972 in Paris when a man named Richard Chanfray announced he was the legendary count. He appeared on French television, and to prove his claim apparently turned lead into gold on a camp stove before the cameras. Chanfray later committed suicide in 1983.

So who was Count Saint-Germain? Was he a successful alchemist who found the secret of eternal life? Was he a time traveler? Or was he a highly intelligent man whose reputation became a fantastic legend?

If you’re still alive, Count de Saint-Germain, I invite you to contact me for an interview. I’m sure my readers would be interested in knowing what you’ve been up to.

Creating the Paranormal

Where is the mind? Where does your consciousness reside? Is it solely a product of your brain? A biologist would likely say yes, since the brain is the only thing the scientist can see, examine, and experiment with. If the mind, or consciousness, is merely the output of the brain, however, how are we to explain the extraordinary cases of fully functional people who have half a brain or very little brain matter at all?

  • A 39-year-old woman in China was found, to her doctors’ surprise, to have just half a brain, on the right side. The left side of her brain was completely missing, yet she lives a completely normal life, having completed high school with good grades. The only reason her doctors found out was because the woman came to them complaining of a feeling of weakness. What puzzled the doctors most was that the left side of the brain is commonly thought to control language, “but this patient has no problem communicating with people,” said the hospital’s director of Neural Rehabilitation Department.
  • A 44-year-old man in France was discovered to have only a thin shell of a brain. Most of his skull was filled only with fluid, leaving room for just the slightest sheet of actual brain tissue. He had a below-average IQ of 75, but was an otherwise normal civil service worker and a married father of two children.
  • A low IQ isn’t always the result of this anomaly, however. A mathematics university student in Sheffield, U.K., who had an IQ of 126, had virtually no brain at all. A CAT scan revealed that the boy had less than a millimeter of cerebral tissue covering the top of his spinal column.

If the brain really is the seat of function, consciousness and personality, then these people should be vegetables or, at best, severely disabled. Yet they are anything but. Certainly, many people who are the victims of brain trauma through accident are disabled, or worse, become vegetables (or die). Yet remarkable people like those mentioned above thrive. It could be because their “abnormality” occurred not as the result of trauma, but slowly over time, or at birth. This allowed the brain to adapt, to hand over its high functions to smaller and smaller vestiges of brain matter.

Even so, how can a fully functional, perfectly normal mind remain?

THE HOLOGRAPHIC BRAIN

The answer might be found in the consciousness rather than the brain. The consciousness of these people has obviously been unaffected by their diminishing or non-existent brains, suggesting that the two may indeed be separate things. The brain may be a mechanism that expresses consciousness, much like a radio can make a broadcast audible, yet they are two different things. If true, than how can an almost non-existent brain mechanism continue to express consciousness?

Michael Talbot theorizes the answer in his groundbreaking book, The Holographic Universe. The brain, he says (recounting the research of neurophysiologist Karl Pribram), might work like a hologram. A hologram is a three-dimensional photograph, and if you break it into pieces, each piece of that hologram contains the entire original photo. So, too, might the brain, no matter how small a piece of it remains, be able to completely express what a whole one can.

So what does all of this have to do with the paranormal?

“The most staggering thing about the holographic model,” Talbot writes, “was that it suddenly made sense of a wide range of phenomena…. These include telepathy, precognition, mystical feelings of oneness with the universe, and even psychokinesis….”

The key to this is that our holographic brains are not stand-alone objects. Your holographic brain – an analogy for your consciousness – mingles and works not only with the holographic brains of everyone else, but with the universe itself. In a real sense, we are all a part of the same universal consciousness, which can explain ESP and other psychic phenomena, as Talbot said.

Now back to our extraordinary people mentioned at the beginning of this article.

BEYOND THE PSYCHIC

Their holographic brains – their consciousness – was able to create the semblance of a “normal” brain, complete with language, memory and other high functions. This is because the brain as hologram is able to tap the greater holographic consciousness (of which it is a part) and fill in – or create – the missing pieces. In The Holographic Universe, Talbot uses the example of those optical illusions we’re all familiar with in which the brain fills in elements of a picture that are not really in the drawing. The brain creates the missing elements because they are what it expects to see.

This gets us to thinking: If the brain can create what it wishes to see in a two-dimensional drawing, can the holographic mind create what it wishes or expects to see in the three-dimensional world? With regard to the paranormal, this could include ghostly apparitions, UFOs and even Bigfoot.

The suggestion here is that these creations of the consciousness are not illusions or figments of the imagination, but three-dimensional, physical-looking, temporary creations (holograms?) that can be viewed by many people, leave footprints, move objects and have other physical effects. (Psychologist Carl Jung suggested this as a possible explanation for UFOs back in 1959.)

I’m not suggesting that all ghosts, UFOs and sightings of Bigfoot are creations of consciousness, but some could be. Some could be just what they appear to be: spirits, alien ships and unknown primates. But in some cases they could be products of what we expect, desire or fear to see – created by the force of our powerful intentions, and physical enough to show up on videotape.