Angel Encounters / Evolution Theories | Coast to Coast AM

Some believe angels to be spirit guides or benefactors, while others see them as protectors. Allie Anderson and Donna Howell, experts of all things angelic, joined Richard Syrett (Twitter) to discuss myths about angels, their role in human culture, and stories of angelic interventions. Humans do not become angels when they die, angels cannot be summoned, and they do not hear our prayers, Anderson explained. Everyone does not have a guardian angel, though angels are charged by God to watch over us, she added. Howell outlined the various angelic members of the celestial order, pointing out the word angel means messenger and they appear as regular humans doing God’s bidding in the Bible…

Read more at: Angel Encounters / Evolution Theories | Coast to Coast AM

Humanoid Creature Captured on Video in Australia

DOUGLAS SHIRE– An explorer in Australia captured the images of what he calls a “Nephilim” creature attached to the roof of an undisclosed cave in Douglas Shire earlier this week.
Nick Malicki, who calls himself the Nephilim Hunter, claims he and his team didn’t spot the oddity until hours later when reviewing the footage at home.

“Normally I know the smell of these things but one of the guys had a flaming torch so I couldn’t catch his scent over the kerosene,” Malicki said.
The 20-second-long video was taken by a pole-mounted camera and shows a humanoid-like grey figure hiding in an alcove inside a cave at a classified location the researcher dubs “The Eye of Ra”. When Malicki points a flashlight in that direction, the purported creature appears to move its head in what looks like an attempt to shield its eyes from the bright beam. A closer look suggests that there could also be a second, smaller individual being carried by the bigger one in a primate-like fashion…

To watch the video and read the full story, go to cryptozoologynews.com.

Religious Phenomena and Miracles

A very interesting article and not to mention, several intriguing points brought up in this article as well.

-Admin

Religious phenomena

By

THE FIRST THING that struck me when I picked up J. Gordon Melton’s book The Encyclopedia of Religious Phenomena was one of the pictures on the cover. It depicts a statue of the Mahayana Buddhist goddess Kuan Yin (see photos at right), and I immediately thought of the artist renderings of the Flatwoods Monster reportedly encountered during a 1952 UFO sighting in Braxton County, West Virginia. It has the same flowing gown and distinctive spade-shaped hood, collar, cowling (or whatever it is) behind the head. In my search for other images of Kuan Yin, only a few others include the spade shape; most do not, indicating that this is not a feature that is necessarily associated with her. So I concluded to my satisfaction that the similarities in the images of the goddess and the Flatwoods “alien” were mere coincidence. I don’t think the Buddhist goddess was making a Fatima-like appearance to the three children of Braxton County. (Although other similarities to Fatima include the sighting of lights in association with the apparitions, and that the being initially appeared to three children, two of which, in both cases, were brother and sister. Other researchers have noted the parallels between the Fatima phenomena and some UFO experiences.)

That is not the most interesting thing about The Encyclopedia of Religious Phenomena, however. Aside from its detailed entries on the phenomena you expect it to cover, it also has a good deal of information on phenomena, events, and people you may never have heard of. Yes, it includes the Shroud of Turin, stigmata, the Marian apparitions at Fatima and other locations, and many more familiar mysteries (although the book inexplicably omits the allegedly incorruptible bodies of various saints), but there are also quite a few that are not so familiar.

BILOCATION

Several saints are credited with the power of bilocation – the ability to appear in two places at once – during their lifetimes. Melton’s book provides the example of Martin de Porres, who in the 17th century was reportedly seen in places as distant as Mexico, northern Africa, China, and Japan, although he never left his home country of Peru. He made this claim of bilocation himself, often able to provide detailed descriptions of the places he visited in his other body.

THE STATUE OF CARTAGO, COSTA RICA

Here’s an account of a Marian miracle I never heard of. While walking along a footpath one day in 1635, young Juanita Pereira found a small statue of a woman bearing a small child in her arms. She took it home as a toy. The next day, she found what she thought was an identical statue in the same place. She took that home, too, but was puzzled by the fact that the first statue had disappeared. This happened again when she found the three-inch statue for a third time at the very same spot along the footpath. She took the statue to a local priest, who immediately recognized the statue as depicting the Madonna and Child. He stored it safely away in a chest… from which it soon disappeared. Of course, they found it back at the spot where Juanita had found it those other times. The priest took this “miracle” as a sign that a shrine to the Virgin should be built on that spot, which it was. The statue is still on display at the Basilica de Nuestra Señora de los Angeles, which replaced the original shrine.

THE DAVENPORT BROTHERS

The Spiritualist movement is generally credited to have begun with the spirit rappings demonstrated by the famous Fox sisters in Hydesville, New York in 1848. Ira and William Davenport of Buffalo, New York, claimed, however, that their spirit rappings began two years previous to the Fox sisters’ experiences. Although Wikipedia calls them magicians, the Davenport Brothers became two of the most widely known Spiritualist mediums of their day, even though they began their careers in their teens. Their demonstrations included the manifestation of floating hands that would pick up musical instruments and play them. Sherlock Holmes author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle believed their marvels to be genuine, but Harry Houdini suspected that that were indeed just clever magicians. Houdini claimed that Ira Davenport confessed their trickery to him shortly before his (Ira’s) death.

For those wondering why this story is in a book on religious phenomena, it’s worth a reminder that Spiritualism is a religion, the center of which is the Lily Dale community in southwestern New York State. (Oddly, there are no entries for Lily Dale or the Fox Sisters – except under the heading “Rappings” – in Melton’s book either.)

PARANORMAL DENTISTRY

We’ve all heard of people being cured of blindness, cancer, and other severe afflictions by miraculous healings… but tooth decay? Hey, why not? An infected tooth is downright agonizing. Louisiana-born Willard Fuller became famous for his paranormal dentistry in the 1940s through to the 1970s. Beginning as a Baptist minister, he later began his own Pentecostal theology and founded the Lively Stones Fellowship. Some people claiming dental healings by Fuller testified that they miraculously found gold fillings in their teeth, where there were none before. Similar gold fillings were attributed to the blessings of the Toronto Airport Fellowship in 1999.

HOLY COAT OF TRIER

The Shroud of Turin and the Veil of Veronica are well-known relics said to be personally related to Jesus of Nazareth. Less well-known is the Holy Coat of Trier. Currently protected in a Catholic cathedral in Trier, Germany, this seamless, plain brown cloth is claimed to be the coat that Jesus wore during his arrest, scourging, and crucifixion – the very coat that the Roman soldiers gambled for, as told in the Gospel of John. Most religious scholars are skeptical of the garment’s authenticity, and it has never been scientifically scrutinized in the way that the shroud has, for example. The earliest it can be traced back to is the 12th century, but is thought by some to date back to the 4th century when it was brought back from the Holy Land by Empress Helena (mother of Constantine) with a number of other questionable relics.

CHANNELING MARS

Many of the encyclopedia’s entries are quite entertaining. The one for Hélène Smith is a case in point. Smith was another prominent medium of the 19th century’s Spiritualist movement. The pretty, Swiss-born medium was nothing if not outrageous in her claims and proclamations. She announced, for example, that she was the reincarnation of Marie Antoinette, and was also able to channel Simandini, the daughter of a 6th century Arab sheik. More fun, though, was her claim that she had astrally traveled to Mars. She described the planet as being astonishingly similar to Europe of the 1890s, but with bizarre Marsisms, including horseless and wheel-less vehicles, and citizens of Mars who wore unisex clothing. In a trance, Smith could even speak in Martian… which later turned out to be mostly French.

Despite certain deficiencies – the legendary rose miracles of St. Theresa are not mentioned, yet the silly grilled cheese sandwich image of the Virgin Mary gets an entry with photo – The Encyclopedia of Religious Phenomena does cover a lot of interesting ground. And it does not feel overly biased toward Christian phenomena, but includes entries for many other faiths, from Islam to New Age. It’s well worth a place on your paranormal bookshelf.

Encounters with Angels

Do you believe in Angels? Have you ever had an encounter with one of these entities? Many people have and have been changed since their encounters. Here’s an interesting article written by Stephen Wagner about personal encounters with these creatures.

WHO ARE THESE mysterious beings? They seem to come out of nowhere just when they are needed, have just what you need to solve the problem, then vanish quickly without a trace. The people who encounter them are often convinced that they are angels – spirit beings who temporarily take on human from to lend a hand in time of need. Skeptics say, of course, that they are just helpful but ordinary people. Yet the reports are surprisingly consistent: no one knows where these helpers come from, and they disappear in an instant when you’re not looking.

Equally frustrating to understand is that the help they lend is very often in relatively mundane circumstances. A stuck car, for instance. You would think that if a heavenly being was going to materialize to help a human (we could call it a miracle, couldn’t we?), it would be in far more important matters than fixing a flat tire.

And who knows; perhaps they do assist in such important matters. And if they are spiritual beings, who are we to question their motives?

Whether you believe they are angels or not, here are some fascinating reports of these mysterious benefactors.

ANGEL IN RED FLANNEL

Angelic assistance isn’t always as mundane as fixing a flat; sometimes it is literally life saving. Twenty-one year old Kimberly was inner-tubing on a back woods Wisconsin river one summer day. “I was in a shallow, but fast part of the river, when my inner tube flipped out from under me,” Kimberly says. “The water was only shin deep, so I ran after my tube. While I was running I fell into a deep spot and got caught in a hydraulic, where water flowing over a rock or other obstacle flows down, then back onto itself in an eruption of whitewater.

“I was sucked down and sucked in over my head. I struggled to reach the surface, which was mere inches away! I grabbed at the water, trying to propel myself upward and out of this water trap. When I realized my efforts were fruitless and I was about to drown, I felt an intense peacefulness and serenity fill me with a warmth I can’t describe.

“Suddenly, someone grabbed me by the wrist, and in one tug had me out of the deep water and standing in ankle-deep water nearby. I caught a glimpse of a blonde woman in a red flannel shirt, but when I turned to thank her for saving my life, there was no one there.”

STRANGER ON THE METRO

There certainly are many kind people in the world who don’t hesitate to help strangers in need – especially children. But was it just a kind man young Brian encountered on an April afternoon in 1999… or was he something more? Patty H. tells us that she along with her husband, their son Brian and daughter were riding the Metro Link on their way to a St. Louis Cardinals baseball game that day.

“Brian had a Sharpie marker and baseball cap that he was planning on get autographs with,” she says. “The Metro Link stopped at Busch Stadium. All of us got off the train. Brian noticed that he dropped the marker and went back on to retrieve it. The doors to the train closed and it left the platform. My son was still on the train! Brian was only 10 years old at the time and it was his first time in the big city. We were just frantic.”

All the family could do was wait for the train to loop back to the station, which took about 35 minutes. When the train finally made it back to the platform, Brian had an interesting story to tell. “While he was on the train,” Patty says, “a black gentleman sat next to him and began to talk to him. He asked him questions and reassured him that he would be fine. Brian said he and the man were the only two people on the train. Yet when the doors to the train opened, the man had strangely disappeared. He did not go out the door. He would have had to walk past us. We believe it was my son’s guardian angel.”

You have your doubts? Eight years later, Patty tells us, this same mysterious man visited their son’s hospital room when he was direly ill.

LICENSE TO SAVE

Here is one of those miraculous roadside assistance stories. The interesting thing about this one, according to Amanda, is that the helpful stranger looked like Jesus himself. Her experience took place in Pottstown, Pensylvania.

“I have never been the real religious type,” Amanda says. “As a matter of fact, I often made jokes about the Bible as well as Jesus. After having compared Jesus to a fictional character one night, I drove with a friend of mine to another friend’s home. Rain was pouring and the weather was unbearable. Somehow my vehicle landed in what appeared to be a river in the middle of the road I was traveling. I tried to call a couple of male friends to try to push my vehicle out. No luck. I sat crying next to my car at 3:00 a.m. in a wooded area, with absolutely no homes present.

“An elderly man came out of the woods, resembling what one would assume to be Jesus: tall, skinny and bearded. He said that he would go get his tow-truck and pull my car out of the rapids. I sat in my boyfriend’s vehicle as the old man drove a tractor over to my vehicle. The license plate on his tractor read: ‘You have a friend in Jesus.’

“Was this a coincidence,” Amanda wonders, “or was Jesus showing me how non-fictional he really is?”

IN THE ARMS OF AN ANGEL

Sharon’s six-month-old daughter was miraculously saved from catastrophe one day when they were out shopping. Sharon and her friend had taken the baby to the mall, pushing her around in a stroller with all the necessaries: diaper bag, purse, etc.

“My biggest challenge in the malls and stores was navigating the escalators,” Sharon says. “Being the cautious type, I would always fold up the stroller and carry it down the escalator in one hand, baby in the other. But this is a dangerous balancing act in itself. I’d seen other people just roll their strollers onto an escalator, ride it down and roll it off at the bottom. I’d always doubted my ability to pull it off, but on this day, against my better judgment, I decided to try it.

“My friend got on the escalator. With my daughter safely strapped in, I rolled the stroller on behind her, then got on myself. A man got on behind me. I didn’t pay much attention to him, but I was aware that he was standing about two or three steps behind me. All was well until we got to the bottom. I was in the process of rolling the stroller off behind her, but something on the stroller caught on the escalator. The stroller stopped dead… I didn’t. I flew over the top of the stroller, arms and legs everywhere. I heard the stroller collapse, but I couldn’t do anything about it – it was like I was tumbling through space in slow motion.

“I didn’t hear my baby cry. As I scrambled to my feet, I feared the absolute worst. My slightly mangled stroller (one wheel was bent) had skidded about 10 feet from the bottom of the escalator. My baby wasn’t in it. But standing right behind me, holding her, was the man who’d gotten on the escalator behind me. She was unhurt and completely calm. He handed my daughter to me without a word. I looked away for just a second, then turned back to him to thank him from the bottom of my heart and ask him how he’d gotten her out of the stroller. But in the time it took me to look away and look back again, he was gone.”

CALL FOR HELP

Every night after work, Alicia would drive out to her ill grandmother’s house to take care of her. You could say she was an angel herself. One night, however, an accident brought Alicia in contact with a being she believes was her guardian angel.

“Being as I drove this every night, I know my cell phone doesn’t receive service though that stretch of road, and I am a very cautious driver and always locked my doors,” Alicia says. “On this night in 2001, I was making the drive as normal when the car in front of me slammed on their brakes. When I slammed on my brakes, my wheels locked and I couldn’t slow down… I rear-ended the car going 50 mph.

“The whole front of my little Saturn caved in up to the steering wheel and my air bag didn’t deploy, so my head was slammed into the steering wheel. I was trapped in my car and my head was bleeding. Just then my car door opened (and like I said, I always lock my doors), and a black gentleman was there. He said, ‘Alisha, you’re going to be ok. Please let me have your phone and I will call your mom.’ I gave him my cell, thinking to myself that it’s not going to work because of the area we’re in… and how did he know my name? The gentleman called my mom and I heard him say, ‘Alisha was in a car accident. She will be fine. You need to come and be with her though.’ He told her the road I was on and hung up.

“Then he held my hand and told me, ‘You’re going to be alright. It’s not your time to go yet.’ I knew the moment he held my hand that I was ok and I felt a peace come over me. I heard the sirens from the fire trucks and the gentleman said, ‘It’s my time to go. You’ll be alright; just have faith.’ He left and the fireman came to check me out. They started asking me questions and asked me if they could call someone to meet me at the hospital. I told them that a black gentleman had already called and that my mom was on her way. The fireman told me that no one was around and checked my phone; he said no call had been made. Just then my mom pulled up (in hysterics, of course) and the fireman just looked at me.

“They transported me to the ER. I had cuts, black eyes and whip lash, and I couldn’t walk for three days, but after some physical therapy I recovered like new. I later asked my mom about the gentleman who called her that night. She said that nothing registered on her caller ID when the call came through, and all she could tell me was the gentleman who called her sounded like a black man. I know in my heart that I had my wonderful guardian angel with me that night. I also found out later that no one was hurt in the vehicle that a rear-ended… but they never saw anyone at my car until the firemen arrived.”

Harbinger of death and destruction or misunderstood mythical boyscout?

This whole Mothman debate of whether or not this creature is some kind of harbinger of chaos has simply gone on too long. I believe this creature is a lesser type of guardian type of spiritual creature that might actually be acting like a ferryman to escort the soon to be deceased souls at the times of whatever accident/disaster about to take place where it has been seen.

I really doubt this creature is anything more than just that…no aliens involved, no dimensional tripping explorer. Just maybe a very bizarre “angel of death” so to speak. That just happens to look like a moth.

-The webmaster

It is often said in Fortean circles that the mysterious appearance of the Mothman, a winged cryptid monstrosity that appeared in the vicinity of Point Pleasant, West Virginia in the late 1960s, was prophetic in nature. Traditionally, researchers have felt that the creature’s presence represented some sort of omen, warning of terrible things to come; specifically, the collapse of the Silver Bridge on December 15, 1967. Though the Mothman certainly isn’t the only winged creature alleged to exist in the realm of the unexplained, it is by far the most famous. Nonetheless, its cousins, reportedly seen at various times and places elsewhere around the globe, are also sometimes seen to be harbingers of ill fortune.

Philosophically, we might find trouble in the possibility that one instance could influence an entire community of beliefs; much the same as we would question whether chickens or eggs came first in the lineage of farmyard fowl, it is equally worthy of consideration whether the perception of misfortune associated with winged monsters is truly a cultural constant, or if it is merely one that has been infiltrated by the widely reported Mothman flap in between 1966-67. After all, since the creature’s strange appearance more than four decades ago, similar circumstances have been attributed to various other winged-devils in locales elsewhere around the world.

One of the lesser known, but potentially more revealing instances of this sort involves the alleged appearance of a large, winged creature around the Chernobyl reactor in the days and weeks before the disaster that occurred there in 1986. Various internet websites detail how strange phone calls, nightmares, and a host of other strange circumstances began to transpire among the nuclear plant’s employees prior to the accident. Additionally, reports of a gigantic black bird, its wingspan somewhere around twenty feet in length, had been seen also. This “bird” bore one curiously distinctive feature, however: it was described, much like the Mothman, as having either no head at all, or having glowing red eyes and a diminutive head with no neck that rested around what would be the upper torso area of a man.

As reactor vessel number four ruptured at the Chernobyl plant on April 26, 1986, a series of explosions occurred as excessive power levels surged within. Many workers, unaware of the deadly radiation in the smoke being emitted, would later die from complications surrounding their exposure. It was during this time that the individuals struggling to put out the fire in the damaged reactor allegedly witnessed the gigantic, headless bird one final time, as it escaped into the smoke-filled air above.

Much like the appearance of the Mothman in the weeks and months leading up to the collapse of the Silver Bridge, these supposed elements of the Chernobyl story seem to detail the presence of a nearly identical creature, as well as similar supernatural circumstances that occurred just prior to the tragedy in Ukraine in the 1980s. However, there is very little evidence to substantiate these claims other than that which, interestingly, became public knowledge around the time of the release of the film, The Mothman Prophecies, based on John Keel’s famous book. Did sightings of a giant, winged “monster” actually occur at Chernobyl, or did the Mothman story of Point Pleasant and, more importantly, film and media portrayals of those events, spark a series of urban legends involving similar disasters around the world?

This would not be the first instance where the Mothman story has been examined for it’s possible association with myths and urban legends. Author and folklorist Jan Harold Brunvand wrote in his book The Baby Train and Other Lusty Urban Legends that many elements of the original encounter in the late 1960s incorporated elements of traditional folk tales and urban legends, namely “My Boyfriend’s Dead,” in which a young woman whose boyfriend disappears to fetch gasoline for a stranded vehicle is found dangling from a noose above the car. “Unfortunately, the only written sources (on Mothman) are books for children,” Brunvand wrote, “or sensationalized and undocumented accounts of ‘mysteries of the mountains’ that fail to quote identifiable persons.” Brunvand’s theory at this point was that, although the stories may have been rooted in some actual occurrence, “the stories–whatever their sources–also incorporated existing folklore.”

Seeking further clarification, Brunvand also notes a response shared with him by a California school teacher, received from the Point Pleasant Chamber of Commerce, after she and her students sent a request for more information on the Mothman. There were several article clippings included in the package they received, as well as titles of books related to the mystery. Brunvan wrote, “The letter also mentioned books that I’ve been unable to locate titled The Mothman Prophecies, and They Knew Too Much About Flying Saucers.” Obviously, before he condemned the more credible Mothman reports as urban legends, Brunvand failed to read any further than the “children’s books” he cited instead (which often contain exaggerations or convoluted regurgitation of well-documented accounts), skipping right over the most authoritative sources on the subject.

However scant or unlikely reports of a similar paranormal circumstance around Chernobyl may be, evidence pertaining to the alleged Mothman flap of the 1960s in West Virgina presents a unique scenario where, after four decades, many of the key witnesses are still alive, or have appeared previously on camera to record their testimony. The body of evidence suggesting that something did indeed occur in the small town of Point Pleasant between 1966-67 is nothing short of staggering; but could it have had a further-reaching effect that did spawn fodder for urban legends, thus associating reports of winged beasts the world over with foreboding disasters? Or, as strange and remote as the possibility may be, could more of these “Mothmen” actually exist in some enigmatic form, for the purpose of warning us of future disasters?

Angels among us

Another realm that facinates me are Angels. The world over has a tale to tell when it comes to Angels, there’s just too many witness accounts, too many stories etc., to just disregard this subject. Here’s an article I ran across for you to read and consider…

Are Angels Around Us?

by KC Evans
Are Angels ambassadors from a Supreme Being? There are many different variations on where the first angel made its appearance. Most religions have some type of winged or flying human. But I always thought true angels would have that certain presence about them that would make you know they was not just a winged flying human. These three of the major western religions, Christianity, Judaism, and Islam believe that angels are the intervening force between us and a Supreme Being. In Buddhism and Hinduism angels are also big players. Angels are mentioned in the bible as early as Genesis as the “Shining Ones” . Christian art begins depicting them somewhere between 306-337 A.D., and some of the other religions have had them since before the 14th century.

Possibly the best known angel is the fallen angel named Satan, Beelzebub,  Lucifer, you know the “old Devil himself”. Even most atheists would recognize the name of that angel. Thru history many angels have made their appearance but some of them are more well known than others. There is the Angel that appeared for the birth of Jesus, the Angel Of Presence, heck there was even an Angel reportedly seen at Valley Forge by General George Washington. Then there is the Seven Archangels: Michael the warrior, Gabriel our messenger to God, Uriel the angel of death or transformation,  and Raphael does healing, these are the four most common of the seven.

So, are Angels ambassadors from a Supreme Being? Angels are supposed to guide us, protect us, heal us, and bring us messages from heaven. There are angels to do just about anything you need help in doing. According to history there will always be an angel around so we are never truly alone in this world. Angels have gained in popularity that has not been seen since around 1900’s, and its no wonder. Time magazine reports 69% of Americans believe they exist. In our chaos filled world doesn’t the idea of angels amongst us, help fill us with just a little bit of peace. It helps re-affirm that even as busy as god must be, we are not alone.

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