Stories of interest from around the Net

Jersey’s got its devil. West Virginia has its Mothman. Texas has… gargoyles? Good ol’ Nick Redfern’s got a clutch of tales from America’s belt buckle featuring these stony nightmares in the sky. This ain’t prosaic stuff, since one of the yarns from a west Texas town draws a parallel with Arthurian legend. Further down the rabbit hole, Craig Woolheater caught wind of Werewolves In Maine with a nifty sighting report. We’re tickled that SKiss would be more flustered if the creature wasn’t a lupine, affirming her suspicion that her hubby has gone off the deep end.
Titanoboa was as long as a semi truck, but paleontologists reckon they’ve been pushing up the daisies for millions of years. Enter Karl Shuker and a file folder brimming with tales of relict ophidians. There are many reasons to be skeptical, the sheer number of accounts in recorded human history may point to the truth lurking in the darkest jungles.
We gather that one must live in a monarchy to effectively prove the emperor has no clothes. Best known for skewering capitalism, western imperialism, with accompanying historical foibles, Robert Newman’s set his sights on atheist messiah Richard Dawkins. Dominic Cavendish wants to show you how Robert deconstructs Dawkins with more class and wit than Ricky Gervais can ever aspire. After all, if it is a dog-eat-dog world, how many cannibalistic canines do you know?
A History Of Elves LiveScience
Long ago and far away, before greys entered our consciousness, elves held sway in the night and the shadowy corners of our minds. Ben Radford runs down the evolution of these fair folk over the centuries, musing upon their persistence in pop culture. Having whet your appetite, hie thee to your local bookseller to acquire Sherry and Brad Steiger’s Real Encounters, Different Dimensions, and Otherworldly Beings. Encyclopedically enumerated for your pleasure, those merry Steigers cover more than pointy-eared entities. Don’t just take our word for it, the man so nice they named him thrice, Paul Dale Roberts just scratches the surface to tickle your fancy for this volume. A fitting centerpiece of any fortean’s library. Less cut and dried isThe Neuroscience Backlash covered by Rich Reynolds. Citing several skeptical treatises upon free will, psychology and neuroscience, it appears mainstream scientist authors have inadvertantly provided an explanation for alien abductions. Rounding out our section, almost as a non-sequitor, is Alejandro Rojas with a UFO Video Over Belfast Believed To Be Flying Entity. Funny bit is there have been similar sightings in the past, and the facts have borne out the object or entity was only a balloon.
Huzzah! Dr. Beachcombing, with a little help from his friends, has found the original Portuguese text claiming American Indians made their way to Germany. Why is this so important? Rather than working on a secondhand account, Beach can give an accurate translation, check for apocrypha, making the tale far more compelling. Rummaging deeper in our grab bag of maverick news, we find Andrew May tut-tutting how an Ig Nobel was foisted upon a paper covering The Scarab And The Stars. While everyone was giggling over dung beetle astrology, the scarabs are more concerned with preparing their brooding balls than cracking jokes about human foibles and fables. Floating high over Anomalist Towers is a Ghost Blimp piloted by no other than Henry Paterson. He regales us with a story of the flying Mary Celeste and its unsolved mystery. Finally, don’t miss picking up Richard Toronto’s latest War Over Lemuria: Richard Shaver, Ray Palmer And The Strangest Chapter Of 1940s Science Fiction. Chronicling the singular life of Richard Shaver, from institutionalization, travelling cross-country, and a collaboration with Ray Palmer setting the UFOlogical field on its ear. Even if you don’t pick it up, John Rimmer admirably runs down this engaging biography as befitting a Pelicanist.

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